Saturday, March 14, 2020

Quotes on Dance and Life from Isadore Duncan

Quotes on Dance and Life from Isadore Duncan Isadora Duncan was an American dancer who rejected classical ballet forms for more natural movements of interpretive dance, which later evolved into modern dance. Isadora Duncan first found fame in Europe which received her more readily. Isadora Duncans personal life was also unconventional and scandalous, including a dramatic death. Selected Isadora Duncan Quotations Adieu, mes amis. Je vais la gloire. reported as her last words.My motto - sans limites.Dance is the movement of the universe concentrated in an individual.I have discovered the dance. I have discovered the art which has been lost for two thousand years.If I could tell you what it meant, there would be no point in dancing it.The dancers body is simply the luminous manifestation of the soul.What I am interested in doing is finding and expressing a new form of life.People do not live nowadays. They get about ten percent out of life.The whole world is absolutely brought up on lies. We are fed nothing but lies. It begins with lies and half our lives we live with lies.I do not teach children, I give them joy.The finest inheritance you can give to a child is to allow it to make its own way, completely on its own feet.So long as little children are allowed to suffer, there is no true love in this world.The real American type can never be a ballet dancer. The legs are too long, the body too supple and the spirit too free for this school of affected grace and toe walking. It seems to me monstrous that anyone should believe that the jazz rhythm expresses America. Jazz rhythm expresses the primitive savage.I had learned to have a perfect nausea for the theatre: the continual repetition of the same words and the same gestures, night after night, and the caprices, the way of looking at life, and the entire rigmarole disgusted me.Virtuous people are simply those who have not been tempted sufficiently, because they live in a vegetative state, or because their purposes are so concentrated in one direction that they have not had the leisure to glance around them.We may not all break the Ten Commandments, but we are certainly all capable of it. Within us lurks the breaker of all laws, ready to spring out at the first real opportunity.Any intelligent woman who reads the marriage contract, and then goes into it, deserves all the consequences.So that ends my first experience with matrimony, which I always thought a highly overrated performance.It has taken me yea rs of struggle, hard work and research to learn to make one simple gesture, and I know enough about the art of writing to realize that it would take as many years of concentrated effort to write one simple, beautiful sentence. Good-bye, America, I shall never see you again! to reporters on leaving for Europe for the last timeArt is not necessary at all. All that is necessary to make this world a better place to live in is to love to love as Christ loved, as Buddha loved.You were once wild here. Dont let them tame you.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

China in the World Economics Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words

China in the World Economics - Essay Example At the conclusion of his trip, the Shanghai Communiqu declared a statement of their shared foreign policy views. But following the suppression of Communist demonstrators in June 1989, U.S. suspended high-level official exchanges with the PRC and weapons exports and also imposed a number of economic sanctions on account of its absence of Human Rights policies. Following the September 11 2001 attacks, the U.S. and PRC commenced a counterterrorism propaganda that positively reflected in their joint ventures and wholly US-owned enterprises in mainland China. The 1969-79 years featured normalization of relations between the People's Republic of China and the United States. The economic and political maturity of China, coupled with new concerns over the nature of Chinese-American interactions (concerns that were prompted by several circumstances, including the Vietnam War and Nixon's surprise visit to the PRC), caused the establishment of full diplomatic relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China. ... The PRC welcomed the visit for a variety of reasons, the most important of which was probably the perceived imminence of a Soviet attack on China. A second factor was Peking's concern that Japan's tremendous economic growth might serve as the basis for a revitalization of Japanese militarism until United States by virtue of its security treaty with Japan help prevent any such Japanese rearmament. The size of the Chinese economy, even measured in current U.S. dollar (USD) terms, is likely to have surpassed that of Britain and leapt to be the fourth largest economy in the world by the end of 2005. Since its re-entry into the world economy in the late 1970s, China has been a beneficiary of the international economic system. In the 1990s, more and more states pursue the strategy of entering into free trade agreements that offer preferential terms of trade among its members while discriminating against nonmembers. The establishment of the WTO in 1995, whose explicit intent was to strength en application of the principle of non-discrimination of its member economies, saw a growth in the number of FTAs. By mid-2000, one hundred and fourteen FTAs were in effect. Steve Van Andel, chairman of the US Chamber of Commerce and board chairman of the US-based Amway Company, during an exclusive interview with People's Daily correspondent Liu Aicheng stationed in the United States the Chinese markets potential and economic development to be very promising. He said: US Amway Company, founded in 1959, is a world-famous producer of household products for daily use. The company has been investing in China for seven years, with the total investment topping US$1 million, and it has planned to expand its investment

Monday, February 10, 2020

Scenario Analysis Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Scenario Analysis - Essay Example Analyzing the scenario, this paper will further aim at recommending remedial strategies by implementing a decision-making tool suitable for resolving the issue. Critical Analysis of the Scenario The given particular scenario exemplifies a care unit comprising thirty-two bed facilities, which include around 15 registered nurses (RNs) and 22 licensed practical nurses (LPNs). Accordingly, the newly hired nursing unit manager is charged with the responsibility of staffing, caring and evaluating operations. It has been identified in this regard that the staff members are facing excessive workload pressure due to ineffective planning and management. There is also a mixture of part-time, full-time and casual staffing in the unit of the care facility, creating perplexities and hurdles in the proper execution of operations. The staff members of the care unit are observed to be unhappy due to workload pressure. Moreover, it is also recognized that the former RN, who was appointed before the ne wly hired nursing unit manager, resigned due to non-cooperation received from other staff members. An insight into the scenario depicts that these issues were the consequence of inadequate pay in accordance with the workload imposed upon the unit manager. Decision-making Tool As per the scenario, it has been recognized that there are various issues affecting the smooth operations and working environment of the care facility of the pediatric unit. In this respect, the newly hired nursing unit manager, on identifying these issues, should adopt a decision-making tool with the objective of devising appropriate plans and strategies so that activities of staff members and other operations are managed in an appropriate fashion. In the present scenario, advancement in the technological field and knowledge in nursing have raised complexities, on the basis of which nurses are required to be more competent and knowledgeable. The major activity of the nursing unit manager is to seek that staff members execute their operations according to the requirement of situations and in accordance with the goals of the care facility. The nursing unit manager is also entrusted with the job to ensure that proper medication and services are offered to patients (Cherie & Gebrekidan, 2005). In this context, with the assigned tasks and responsibilities along with numerous issues in the pediatric unit of the care facility, the nursing unit manager can be suggested the decision-making tool of decision ladder. The nursing unit manager, with the assistance of the decision-making tool, will be facilitated with the opportunity of recognizing issues, assessing possible solutions and identifying alternative ways on the basis of which these issues can be resolved. This decision-making tool postulates a systematic procedure to resolve a particular issue as that witnessed in the given scenario. The procedure can be identified as a multidirectional and multistep process, which includes situational ana lysis, developing alternatives, examining the selected alternatives and implementing appropriate plans as suited for the resolution of the issue identified. The decision-making tool will assist the newly hired nursing manager in recognizing problems in the operations of the unit, which include patient care and requirement, work intensity and payment structure, etc.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Criminal Justice Administration in New Jersey Essay Example for Free

Criminal Justice Administration in New Jersey Essay Spending is an important aspect of criminal justice administration in any jurisdiction. In many instances, budgeting in public administration is a crossroads between policy issues and politics which makes prioritizing very essential. According to New Jersey Policy Perspective (2003), the spending in the state’s criminal justice system especially the correctional facilities has increased tremendously in the last few decades. This has been as a result of the rapid increase in the number of incarcerated offenders in the state correctional facilities where the number has tripled since early 1980s. Consequently, spending in the correctional facilities in the state of New Jersey has been the fastest growing compared to other departments in the states and was estimated that the figure in the 2005 fiscal year would surpass the amount spent by all states in 1975. Moreover, since late 1990s, the correctional facilities in New Jersey have been operating at over capacity and are rated the sixth most crowded facilities in the country. However, this increased spending due to increased incarceration has taken place as the rate of crime in the country is on a downward trend. The correctional facilities in New Jersey consists of fourteen state facilities, nine of which houses male offenders, one reserved for female offenders, three for juveniles while the one is designated as a reception and intake center. It is also the responsibility of the same department to manage offenders who have completed their sentence but are considered dangerous to the society (NJPP, 2003). As the number of offenders housed in New Jersey states correctional facilities from under capacity in the early 1980s to over 135 percent in 2003, the spending in the correctional department increased proportionally. The large number of convicts incarcerated translated into a need for more staff to manage the systems. For example, the number of employees in the correctional facilities and related jobs were about 13,685. This number of employees was only second to the Department of Human Services. However, the parole officers were needed due to the increased number of individuals under parole in the states surpassed the number of prison officers required in the correctional facilities. The number of offenders under parole rose from under ten thousand to over thirteen thousand between 1983 and 2003 (NJPP, 2003). As the number of individuals under incarceration and parole has increased over the years, the need for more budgetary allocation to the state correctional department has been inevitable. According to the New Jersey Policy Perspective report, the money allocated to the correctional programs in the states rose by about 555 percent in twenty years hitting 1. 1 billion dollars in 2003 up from 203 dollars in 1983. There are many factors including changes in the law that are considered responsible for the increased number of inmates in the states correctional facilities and consequently increased spending. Some of them include changes in the law and statutes within the state’s jurisdiction such as the criminal code and drug laws enforcement statutes (NJPP, 2003). In conclusion, the increased spending in the New Jersey correctional facilities is inevitable. Just as in other states and federal correctional institutions that have been overwhelmed by the increased number of incarcerated offenders or individuals under paroles in the last three decades, the New Jersey facilities have been equally affected by the trends. The increased need for more prison and parole staff, training and caring for offenders in the states facilities has skyrocketed spending in the New Jersey correctional department.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

The Devastating Effects of Intolerance :: essays research papers

The Devastating Effects of Intolerance   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Intolerance is something that everyone has to deal with; It is a nation-wide problem. There are many forms of intolerance and all of them lead to devastation. This is shown throughout history, literature and in personal events. We are the only ones who can stop it.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  One form of intolerance is religious bigotry. This is clearly illustrated in Elie Wiesel's book called Night. In this novel Elie and his family are put into a Nazi death camp in 1944. The experience was a life changing event for the young Elie. He tragically witnessed the death of his family and loss everything he knew. Elie and his family were only one of the millions affected by the hate of the Germans as it states in the book Night: 'I witnessed other hangings'; (page 60). Millions of peope died because of the hate in some people. Hate can be shown in many other forms too.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  One form is clearly shown in Wilma Elizabeth McDaniel's short story entitled 'Who Said We all had to Talk Alike?' A woman from the Ozarks named Neffie, applies for a job in California. Neffie is sent back after just one month because she 'added an 'r'; to many words that did not contain that letter.'; This incident was devastating to the children she was caring for because they really liked Neffie and the way that she cooked and told stories. This also made Neffie feel like there was something wrong with her. The children probably lost one of the best baby-sitters. This is just a small example of an act of intolerance that can even have unintended consequences that hurt many people.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Devastating intolerance can also be seen in the short story 'Address Unknown'; by Kressman Taylor. An act of religious bigotry and someone's beliefs can become a part of someone else's way of thinking or internalizing one's ideas. The 'Address Unknown'; is about two friends, Max and Martin. Martin is a German in Germany and Max is a Jew in America. Martin is galvanized by Hitler's ways. In short, the two friends become enemies turning against each other. Max's sister,also a Jew, dies because Martin wouldn't help her. Max seeks revenge by sending damaging letters to Martin. The outcome of Martin's family is not stated but it is not very good.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Helen Bansley was faced with religious intolerance when she wanted to get married in 1949. The Devastating Effects of Intolerance :: essays research papers The Devastating Effects of Intolerance   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Intolerance is something that everyone has to deal with; It is a nation-wide problem. There are many forms of intolerance and all of them lead to devastation. This is shown throughout history, literature and in personal events. We are the only ones who can stop it.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  One form of intolerance is religious bigotry. This is clearly illustrated in Elie Wiesel's book called Night. In this novel Elie and his family are put into a Nazi death camp in 1944. The experience was a life changing event for the young Elie. He tragically witnessed the death of his family and loss everything he knew. Elie and his family were only one of the millions affected by the hate of the Germans as it states in the book Night: 'I witnessed other hangings'; (page 60). Millions of peope died because of the hate in some people. Hate can be shown in many other forms too.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  One form is clearly shown in Wilma Elizabeth McDaniel's short story entitled 'Who Said We all had to Talk Alike?' A woman from the Ozarks named Neffie, applies for a job in California. Neffie is sent back after just one month because she 'added an 'r'; to many words that did not contain that letter.'; This incident was devastating to the children she was caring for because they really liked Neffie and the way that she cooked and told stories. This also made Neffie feel like there was something wrong with her. The children probably lost one of the best baby-sitters. This is just a small example of an act of intolerance that can even have unintended consequences that hurt many people.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Devastating intolerance can also be seen in the short story 'Address Unknown'; by Kressman Taylor. An act of religious bigotry and someone's beliefs can become a part of someone else's way of thinking or internalizing one's ideas. The 'Address Unknown'; is about two friends, Max and Martin. Martin is a German in Germany and Max is a Jew in America. Martin is galvanized by Hitler's ways. In short, the two friends become enemies turning against each other. Max's sister,also a Jew, dies because Martin wouldn't help her. Max seeks revenge by sending damaging letters to Martin. The outcome of Martin's family is not stated but it is not very good.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Helen Bansley was faced with religious intolerance when she wanted to get married in 1949.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Cultural Competence Essay

The claim that every person is a product of his own cultural background which includes, among other things, his life experiences as well as family, religion, ethnicity and age (Kim, 2001, p. 207) reflects the idea that cultural competence inevitably requires an understanding of other people’s cultural background other than one’s own. While it is true that â€Å"our cultural inventory provides us with valuable insights for understanding our beliefs and attitudes† as well as our values and assumptions† (Kim, 2001, p.  207), it is also important to consider the need to fill that inventory with how other individuals perceive people from other cultural backgrounds. With respect to cultural competence, it is not always enough to satisfy the need to widen our cultural awareness solely through our personal knowledge of other cultures. Indeed, it is true that we should look into the different parts of â€Å"our own cultural identity and examine their positive and negative impacts on our professional and personal development† (Kim, 2001, p. 27). But more to that, we should also consider how other people see other people in terms of their cultural background. In essence, cultural competence can sustain cultural awareness and tolerance inasmuch as it can further foster interaction among cultures. According to Johnson, Lenartowicz and Apud (2006), cultural competence involves at least four elements: knowledge of personal cultural worldview, knowledge of other cultural worldviews and practices, perception towards differences in cultures, and cross-cultural skills. Assuming that we are the products of each of our own cultural backgrounds, it appears that to be culturally competent means to be able to recognize other cultures and to be able to interact with those cultures. Interaction can come in many forms, from simple hand and facial gestures to the more complex ones such as personal interaction on a verbal basis. Whatever way we choose to interact with people who belong to another culture, it is important to practice tolerance towards cultural differences. Cultural intolerance can very well lead to disagreement or, worse, to bigotry. Cultural competence presupposes cultural tolerance precisely because the latter allows individuals from distinct cultures to interact with one another without resorting to hatred or bigotry. Cultural tolerance can only progress if people begin to realize the idea that the belief-systems that each one of us subscribes to does not necessarily invoke the task to assimilate others into our own belief-systems (Persell, 1997). It can also progress if people are able to realize that various cultures can live side-by-side without necessarily interfering with the affairs of one another (Fischer, 2007). If communities of individuals are able to coexist and interact, the cultural landscape becomes one that is peaceful and lively. In a peaceful and lively society thriving with unique cultures, the task of obtaining and practicing cultural competence becomes an easy task. On the other hand, a society where racial bigotry exists among others is a society that pre-empts cultural competence right at the bud. One way to achieve cultural tolerance is through seeing and understanding how other people understand other people from other cultures. Additionally, it also helps to see and understand how other individuals interact with other individuals from other cultures. Like a third-person viewer, being aware of the dynamics of the cultural exchanges of people expands our mental horizons as we become more equipped with cultural knowledge that we may have hardly had in directly interacting with people from other cultures. Our cultural inventory becomes more comprehensive since we are able to gather more information about how people from different cultures communicate, for instance, with one another. Many different forms of cultural exchanges happen in ordinary life and to be able to bear witness to these different forms gives us a clearer picture of what it takes to be culturally competent. When we begin to realize that cultures do not essentially incite hatred and indifference, we become more convinced to study other cultures and to mingle with other people. Eventually, being culturally competent becomes an easy task to take. Another way to achieve cultural tolerance is through a theoretical study of the practices and beliefs of various cultures. This can be done with the help of academic institutions which offer formal ways to introduce and to educate people about the ways of other cultures. These institutions provide a pivotal role in enlightening people—presumably students—about unfamiliar cultures and their practices and beliefs. Armed with cultural insight, people can, in a manner of speaking, let other cultures be. Moreover, the education given by these academic institutions provide a fundamental block towards reaching the goal of cultural competence; for without at least an academic knowledge of cultures there can hardly be any individual progress towards any one of the four elements of cultural competence. Perhaps the most effective and yet most difficult way of achieving cultural tolerance is through the study and practice of the languages of other people. Interestingly, it is argued that language holds the most useful key to understanding other cultures (D’Andrade, 2002). The setup and function of the linguistic component of culture appears to be universal. That is, every language in the world regardless of cultural distinctions involves the receiver and the sender of the message of the medium, language being the medium. Language regardless of cultural distinctions is essentially used for communication, which is why learning a ‘foreign’ language is a crucial step in learning a ‘foreign’ culture because it enables us to penetrate linguistic barriers. Having the language of another culture as part of our so-called â€Å"cultural inventory† is a formidable advantage in dissolving the hindrances towards a comprehensive cultural awareness and, ultimately, cultural competence. How is it possible that cultural tolerance leads to cultural competence? For the most part, a person who is tolerant of other cultures is a person who has already satisfied the need to know one’s own culture and other cultures. An individual cannot be tolerant of a culture which he or she is not even aware of. Moreover, the culturally tolerant person is also someone who has already formed his own perceptions towards other cultures including his own. The only thing missing in all of these is the actual practice of that tolerance into reality. A person who is fully tolerant of other cultures is one who is already able to interact with other individuals who belong to another race or religion, for instance. As a case in point, expatriates are people who have been absorbed into another culture in more or less the same way as they have absorbed such culture into their lives. They are culturally tolerant individuals because, at the least, they are able to mingle and live with people of what used to be a different culture. More importantly, expatriates are also individuals who possess cultural competence not only as a result of their cultural tolerance but also as a product of their interest and inclination in becoming ‘one’ with another culture. They become thoroughly attached to another culture to the point that they are already able to speak the native tongue, subscribe to and practice the dominant religion or even adapt the general lifestyle of that culture. In any case, cultural competence and cultural tolerance go with one another in most, if not all, instances. It may be noted, however, that our reflection on â€Å"the various aspects of our own cultural identity and [our examination of] their positive and negative impacts on our professional and personal development (Kim, 2001, p. 207)† may not necessarily lead to cultural competence. It may only lead us to cultural tolerance to a certain degree without ever reaching the stage of putting into practice what we have learned from our acts of reflection and examination of our cultural identity. Even though â€Å"each of us is a product of our cultural background (Kim, 2001, p. 2007),† we are not naturally inclined to be culturally competent. The fact that there are people who struggle to become culturally competent and that there are those who deny themselves of the chance to become one suggests the same thing—human beings are not naturally inclined to know other cultures and to interact with them. However, what it entails on a positive note is the idea that there is the possibility of an overlap among the many different factors involved in determining the cultural identities of individuals. Perhaps the biggest struggle towards achieving cultural competence is overcoming the possibility of treating one’s personal cultural worldview or even one’s culture as superior to the rest. In submitting to such risk, we become more prone to cultural intolerance as we tend to put down cultures other than our own. We may eventually lose interest in knowing other cultural worldviews and in observing people of different cultures interact with one another from an outsider’s perspective. Our â€Å"cultural inventory† becomes filled only with our own cultural worldviews and our reflection and examination of culture may hardly extend towards other cultures. Nevertheless, people can overcome all these risks and struggles as part of the task of becoming culturally competent. A person’s level of cultural competence may hardly be quantified (Fischer, 2007) but it does not mean that there is no such thing as cultural competence. The fact that cultures exist and the fact that each person is the product of his own cultural background (Kim, 2001) suggests that interaction among cultures is possible, if not highly likely. Obtaining cultural competence may be a laborious task but, in the end, it poses large benefits in sustaining cultural tolerance on both personal and group levels. REFERENCES D’ANDRADE, R. (2002) Cultural Darwinism and Language. American Anthropologist, 104, 223-232. FISCHER, M. M. J. (2007) Culture and Cultural Analysis as Experimental Systems. Cultural Anthropology, 22, 1-65. JOHNSON, J. P. , LENARTOWICZ, T. & APUD, S. (2006) Cross-Cultural Competence in International Business: Toward a Definition and a Model. Journal of International Business Studies, 37, 525-543. KIM, E. Y. (2001) The Yin and Yang of American Culture: A Paradox, London, Intercultural Press. PERSELL, C. H. (1997) The Interdependence of Social Justice and Civil Society. Sociological Forum, 12, 149-172.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Multiple Personalities in Sybil Essay - 879 Words

Multiple Personalities in Sybil Do you ever feel as though you are acting as a different person in different situations? Do you ever feel as though acting fake? You are definitely not alone in your thoughts and feelings, but do note that there is always something or someone more extreme than you are. One such person is the character of Sybil Dorsett, in Flora Rheta Schreibers novel, Sybil. The novel, Sybil, takes a look at multiple personalities within a person. It is based on the research of Dr. Cornelia Wilbur. Dr. Wilbur was a psychoanalyst who had been treating Sybil for about three months. One day, Sybil, who was a schoolteacher, burst into the room in a hysterical speech. Her fists were clinched with rage as she†¦show more content†¦Wilbur began to learn more and more about each different personality. She figured that this was the only answer or way to treat Sybil. She was going to have to treat each of Sybils separate selves. The way that she was going to have to eventually treat Sybil t hough was by going into the past and bringing up some of the repressed memories that Sybil had from childhood. She would then have to make Sybil bring together all of the different selves and come to terms with the past and the reality of the present and future. Some of the more flamboyant personalities were Sybil, of course, who was generally shy and withdrawn, Peggy, who was quite aggressive, Vicky, who is quite sophisticated, Mary, who was quite obese, but yet motherly, Vanessa, who had the aura of an actress, baby-Ruthie, who was very childlike, and two energetic, high-spirited young males, Mike and Sid. The treatment of these different selves was going to be an enormous task any way that Dr. Wilbur looked at it. Another odd that was stacked against her was that Sybil was in the guise of the other personalities at least one-third of her life and had no recollection of ever doing any of the things that she did while she was another self. However, there was an interesting twi st to that. The other selves were very aware of Sybil and often spoke of her in sessions. They believed that she was another person and often told Dr. Wilbur that they were there (at session) in Sybils place forShow MoreRelatedSybil: Movie Analysis [Multiple Personality Disorder]1547 Words   |  7 PagesA. DSM IV CRITERIA DSM-IV-TR Criteria for Dissociative Disorders: Dissociative identity disorder. Presence of two or more identities or personalities that take control of the person’s behavior; loss of memory for important personal information. B. 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According to Vedat Sar s (2014) artic le â€Å"TheRead MorePsychiatric And Psychological Records Of Dissociative Identity Disorder1530 Words   |  7 Pagespsychological records of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID); previously called Multiple Personality Disorder. Dissociative Identity Disorder exists as a peculiar mental disorder in which a person possesses two or more evident and distinctive personalities. Through accounts like the movie Sybil, this disorder received much attention worldwide completely altering our previous ideas about Multiple Identity Disorder. The movie Sybil is based on a true story of a shy, college student, working as a substituteRead MoreReflection Of Sybil1496 Words   |  6 Pages Sybil is about a woman who receives treatment over the course of 10 years for her multiple personalities. Part one of the book starts with Sybil in her chemistry classroom, the crash of glass makes her head throb. It takes her back to broken glass in the drugstore, and the broken glass in the big dining room. Both times there had been an accusing voice: â€Å"You broke it.†(Sybil pg. 23). At this time Sybil was not sure why she would disappear, and come to in random parts of the city, or states. SheRead MoreDissociative Identity Disorder and Abuse Essay1059 Words   |  5 PagesThe condition once known as multiple personality disorder (MPD) is a very real psychological phenomenon that until recently was mis-understood and often mis-diagnosed. Dissociative identity disorder, DID, as we now call it, is a mental illness where a persons thoughts, feelings, and memories are scattered throughout two or more separate personalities within the victims mind (Appelbaum 107). In 1973 perhaps the worlds most famous psychiatric patient ever, Sybil brought attention to what wasRead MoreSybil Reaction Paper732 Words   |  3 PagesThe Multiple Personalities in Sybil The movie Sybil brought out several different emotions and reactions personally for me. The story line follows a young woman’s struggle with personality disorder; the cause and effects of her disease throughout her life, and the process of her repressed memories finally coming to the surface. Although I wouldn’t say that the disorders that Sybil and I have are comparable, the process that she went through in becoming aware of her disorders and the devastationRead MoreSymptoms And Symptoms Of An Traumatic Stress Disorder971 Words   |  4 Pagesare multiple types of amnesias, I will be focusing on psychogenic amnesia. â€Å"Psychogenic amnesias are usually caused by some sort of emotional trauma. Emotional trauma is the common thread that runs through the amnesia associated with the following disorders: dissociative amnesia (the inability to recall significant personal information); fugue (memory loss accompanied by sudden, unexpected travel from home); dissociative identity disorder (the presence of two or more distinct personalities, withRead MoreDissociative Identity Disorder : Sybil And Primal Fear1477 Words   |  6 PagesPsychology 210 7 October 2015 Dissociative Identity Disorder: Sybil and Primal Fear In the films â€Å"Sybil,† and â€Å"Primal Fear† both characters Sybil, and Aaron seem to be suffering from dissociative identity disorder. According to Comer (2014), someone with dissociative identity disorder, or also known as multiple personality disorder establishes two or more recognizable personalities, often called alternate or sub personalities. Each personality has their own particular set of behaviors, memories, emotions